Jewish Genealogy Society of Cleveland

         

Upcoming Programs

The programs currently planned through March, 2022 are scheduled to be on Zoom,
but space is limited, and priority will be given to members of the Jewish Genealogy Society of Cleveland.
The programs will be available to non-members at no cost.
Advance Registration is required for each program and must be requested by noon on the day of the program.

Wednesday,
January 12, 2022
7:00 pm

Web Based
Presentation

Meeting and Installation of 2022 Officers and Directors

"Here Comes The 1950 Census:
What To Expect"
Presented by Joel Weintraub

The U.S. 1950 census will become public on April 1, 2022. Joel will provide advice on what you can do now to prepare for the rollout. He will cover what is a census, who uses the census, census caveats, who was enumerated (most Americans abroad in the military or diplomatic service will not be part of the rollout), how the 1950 census was taken, training of enumerators, enumerator instruction manuals, census sampling, and 1950 population and housing forms and large city block summaries. Joel will then discuss locational tools for finding people as a name index won’t be available for some time after the opening. The National Archives census map collection (available online), and his and Steve Morse’s 1950 locational tools, online right now at the One-Step stevemorse.org website, will end the talk. The One-Step 1950 utilities took almost 8 years to produce with the help of 69 volunteers and involve 230,000 or so searchable 1950 census district definitions with about 79,000 more small community names added, and street indexes for over 2,400 1950 urban areas that correlate with 1950 census district numbers.

Joel Weintraub

 
Joel Weintraub, a New Yorker by birth, is an emeritus Biology Professor at California State University, Fullerton. He became interested in genealogy over 20 years ago and volunteered for 9 years at the National Archives in southern California. Joel helped produce location tools for 1900 through 1950 federal censuses, and the NY State censuses for NYC (1905, 1915, 1925) for the Steve Morse “One-Step” website. He has published articles on the U.S. census and the 72-year rule, the name change belief and finding difficult passenger records at Ellis Island, and searching NYC census records with the problems of NYC geography. He has a YouTube channel that has his genealogy (and field biology) talks at “JDW Talks”.

 

To register for this program:

  • JGSC Members: Please click on the following link: rsvp@JGSCleveland.org
  • JGSC Non-members: Please click on the following link: rsvp@JGSCleveland.org and
    provide your full name, email address, and complete mailing address.

Requests must be submitted by noon on the day of the program.

Wednesday,
February 9, 2022
7:00 pm

Web Based
Presentation

Meeting and Webinar

"The Cultural Phenomenon of Home DNA Testing"
Presented by Libby Copeland

The presentation will explore the extraordinary cultural phenomenon of home DNA testing, which is redefining family history. It will draw on Libby Copeland’s years of research for her new book The Lost Family: How DNA Testing is Upending Who We Are (Abrams, 2020), which The Wall Street Journal calls “a fascinating account of lives dramatically affected by genetic sleuthing.” With more than 37 million people having been tested, a tipping point has been reached. Virtually all Americans are affected whether they have been tested or not, and millions have been impacted by significant revelations in their immediate families. The presentation will discuss the implications of home DNA testing for Jewish genealogy, as well as the unique challenges of genetic genealogy for Ashkenazim.

Libby Copeland

 
Bio Libby Copeland is an award-winning journalist and author who writes from New York about culture and science. As a freelance journalist, she writes for such media outlets as The Washington Post, The New York Times, The Atlantic and Smithsonian Magazine. Her book, The Lost Family: How DNA Testing is Upending Who We Are, published by Abrams in 2020, explores the rapidly evolving phenomenon of home DNA testing, its implications for how we think about family and ourselves, and its ramifications for American culture broadly.

The Wall Street Journal says it’s “a fascinating account of lives dramatically affected by genetic sleuthing.” The New York Times writes, “Before You Spit in That Vial, Read This Book.” The Washington Post says The Lost Family “reads like an Agatha Christie mystery” and “wrestles with some of the biggest questions in life: Who are we? What is family? Are we defined by nature, nurture or both?” It was recently named to The Guardian’s list of The Best Books of 2020.

Wednesday,
March 2, 2022
7:00 pm

Web Based
Presentation

Meeting and Webinar

"Out of the Whirlwind: Finding the Family You Lost in the Holocaust
Presented by Deborah H. Long

The daughter of two Holocaust survivors, Deborah Long reviews the best (as well as some of the obscure) resources and methods for determining the fate of those involved in the Holocaust, including survivors and victims. Deborah will use examples from her own research to demonstrate the documents and artifacts she discovered.

Deborah Long has been researching her family history and searching for surviving family members for more than 50 years. Deborah is a professional educator and speaker, though typically her audiences are licensed professionals who are required to attend continuing education programs. She has written more than 20 books, including a memoir about growing up as a child of survivors titled “First Hitler, Then Your Father, and Now You” available at lulu.com. She is the founder and first president of Triangle JGS in the Triangle area of North Carolina (Chapel Hill/Durham/Raleigh). She can be reached at DebbieTheTeacher@gmail.com.

Deborah H. Long